Electronic Access Control

Electronic Access Control (EAC) ultimately controls personal or vehicular access through a door, portal or other physical control barriers by means of an electrically operated release mechanism, referred to as electro-mechanical locking device.

These locking devices take many forms, the most popular being:

Electric Strikes
These devices are fitted in the normal latch lock strike plate position and perform the role of an electrically controlled collapsible strike plate.  These work in conjunction with a locking spring latch, preferably with an anti-thrust* bolt.  Electric strikes are available in fail-secure* and fail-safe* modes, with electrical latch position monitoring.

Electro-Magnetic Locks
These locks are fitted to doors and hold the door closed by magnetic force.  No moving mechanical parts are engaged.  Generally used in fail-safe* applications, but with battery back-up they can be applied for fail-secure* operation.  Locked status can be electrically monitored.

Solenoid Operated Locks
This lock incorporates an electric solenoid, which is a magnetic coil and plunger device, the bolt or latch being thrown by magnetic force. The locking bolt interferes with the stike-plate of the lock. These locks can be either fail-secure* or fail-safe* and are generally monitored for bolt throw. A charged spring returns the bolt to its de-energised state.

Motorised Locks
The operation of these locks is similar to the solenoid lock with the exception that the bolt is motorised to lock and unlock.  The motorised bolt lock is stable in either the locked or unlocked position - as selected.

Definitions

Fail-safe: In the event of a general power failure, the lock releases, making it safe for the occupants to exit in an emergency.

Fail-secure: In the event of a power failure, the lock remains locked, making the assets in the protected area secure.
Dead Locking (anti-thrust): When the door is closed, the spring latch of the lock cannot be forced back.